Review: Those Girls by Lauren Saft


Those Girls by Lauren Saft

Book: Those Girls
Author: Lauren Saft
Series: none
Publish date: June 9, 2015
Number of pages: 336
Summary: Some girls will always have your back, and some girls can’t help but stab you in it.

Junior year, the suburbs of Philadelphia. Alex, Mollie and Veronica are those girls: they’re the best of friends and the party girls of the school. But how well does everybody know them–and really, how well do they know one another? Alex is secretly in love with the boy next door and has joined a band–without telling anyone. Mollie suffers from a popular (and possibly sociopathic) boyfriend, as well as a serious mean streak. And Veronica just wants to be loved–literally, figuratively, physically….she’s not particular. Will this be the year that bonds them forever….or tears them apart for good?

Lauren Saft masterfully conveys what goes on in the mind of a teenage girl, and her debut novel is raw, honest, hilarious, and thought-provoking, with a healthy dose of heart.
Rating: 2.5 out of 3 stars


I received a copy of this book via NetGalley on a read to review basis in exchange for an honest review.


When I picked up this book, I thought it was going to be about some popular girls and their drama, how they ruled the school, and how they manipulated others as well as each other. However, the book ended up being about three rich, popular girls and their sex lives. If it had revolved on their sex lives and had a little more plot, I think I would have enjoyed it, but the fact that it revolved on their sex lives and the other plotlines were just side plots made the book less enjoyable for me.
First, the story is told in three points of view: those of Alex, Molly, and Veronica–the three popular girls and supposed best friends. While I usually like a book told in multiple points of view, I was not able to enjoy this or really connect with any of the characters. It is stated that Alex and Molly have been best friends and that Veronica joined their little group late, which is very clearly shown by the way the other two exclude and talk about Veronica to her face and behind her back. Each point of view was not seamlessly connected with the others, and I felt myself passively reading the book.
Secondly, I felt the way Veronica was portrayed as a slut who just put out for everyone was horrible. Sure, she did have sex with a lot of guys and crossed a lot of lines, but I felt that the other characters, who were supposedly her friends, shamed her because of it. Their language to her was awful. I understand that the author was trying to portray high school life, but some of the things she said were over the top and seemed unrealistic.
Lastly, I couldn’t connect or feel anything for any of these girls and their situations. I was also unable to believe the things they did and the lines they crossed. As I said, the book felt forced and unrealistic to me–a former high school student. Most of all though, the ending was extremely unbelievable considering all of the circumstances that happened throughout the book.
Overall, I didn’t enjoy this book and read it passively, waiting for it to end.